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Luis Brens | ‘Mis Momentos en Cuba’ at The Garner Center


Exhibition Runs: January 5, 2015 through February 14, 2015
Artist Reception: Wednesday, January 14th, 5pm – 7pm

LUISBRENSHIREZ1 Boston based photographer, professor and mixed media artist, Luis Brens, captures the vibrant street life of Cuba in this intimate essay on the rhythms of the street. Avenues lined in weathered architecture provide a backdrop for the pictures as we discover classic cars, youth culture and flamboyant personalities engaging us at every turn.

Originally from the Dominican Republic, Luis moved to Boston in 1990 and earned a BFA in Photography and Printmaking from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He works as both a professor and commercial photographer and his work has been featured in Vogue, Boston Common and Boston Magazine. Luis currently teaches at both Northeastern University and The New England School of Photography.LUISBRENSHIREZ2

 Meet the artist on Wednesday, January 14th 5pm -7pm!

The Garner Center is open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, and on Saturday from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. The gallery is located at 537 Commonwealth Avenue in Boston on the second floor of the New England School of Photography.

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Introducing the NESOP Alumni Portal

portalpicNESOP proudly announces the launch of our new Alumni Portal. Alumni can access the portal through the NESOP website under the Alumni menu navigation item from the home page, or, simply go here.

The alumni portal is an easy way to access job leads at any time, update your personal information and stay connected with fellow alumni and 2nd year students.  Alums are encouraged to take a few minutes to set up/request an account, your account request will then be submitted for approval. Once approved, you will receive a confirmation e-mail and will be ready to log-in and enjoy all the new features of the portal!

Things to Note:

Job Leads: As of  July 11th, job leads will no longer be emailed out to alumni database, all job leads will now be accessible through the portal and are available 24/7. They are posted in real time, so check back as often as you like.

Calls for Entry will also be posted and accessible via the portal. If you have a Call for Entry that you want to post to the portal for your fellow alums and current NESOP students, there are options for you to do so.

2nd Year Students: Your access to the portal is limited until you graduate. As a student, you will have access to job leads and Calls for Entry only. When you graduate, you will have access to the full Alumni Portal.

Class of ’13 Commencement Address: Tara Morris ’07

2007 NESOP graduate Tara Morris was selected as the 2013 Commencement Speaker and recipient of this year’s Alumni Achievement Award.

In her address to the Class of 2013, Tara, co-owner of Hitched Studios (voted ‘Best of Boston‘ for Wedding Photography in 2011,) shares her post-graduate experiences and encourages students to celebrate their strengths.

“There is no better life than the life of a successful artist – you are at that door, and it is in your hands.”

Video by Long Haul Films.

Expert Insights: Keitaro Yoshioka

NESOP Architectural Photography instructor, Keitaro Yoshioka, took a few minutes to share his thoughts on the most important elements for an emerging photographer in developing a marketing and business plan.

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NESOP: What do you believe are the five most important elements to guide an (emerging) photographer in developing his/her business plan and why? 

Keitaro: First of all, I think it is important to note that I don’t believe the standard MBA-format business plan works well for photographers.  It doesn’t fit the creative model for new photographers attempting to launch their careers.  Originally a vehicle for obtaining bank or investor funding, the “traditional” business plan has elements that are important but others that simply don’t apply in this context. 

I also think it is important that anyone entering this field understands the difference between photo enthusiasts and professional photographers.  If you want to make a living as a photographer, you need to have technical, creative and business skills and understand that, as a professional photographer, you are running your own business

With this in mind, I require my students to create both a marketing plan and a five-year plan.  Five key elements in developing these are:

1.                  Have a vision and trust your vision.  Know what makes you and your work unique.  The are a lot of photographers out there and they all have something different to offer; the most successful ones will all agree that you must trust your vision.  As an emerging artist, understand that your portfolio may be as good as or better than many of the established professionals.  To succeed, you must stay true to your vision and market yourself well. 

2.                Create your marketing materials and marketing plan; keep your “brand” in mind when doing this.  You are going to send out your own promotional cards and other promo materials (hard copy and/or electronic depending on your clients and strategy).  These materials should include your strongest image(s) and the images and materials should clearly represent/describe what you do.  Your materials should convey the image you want for your business. 

3.                Research the market to identify your potential clients. Create your (client) database based on research.  Your database should contain the company name (if applicable) and contact information (mailing address, e-mail address, direct phone or extension, website, social media sites, etc.) for all the individuals who will make the hiring decision.  Don’t simply target a department—send your materials to the marketing director, photo editor, creative director, art director, etc.  Ultimately, you want to get in front of these individuals, show them your portfolio and make a (positive) impression on them.  Create a schedule to follow up with anyone to whom you’ve sent your promotional materials—do what works: make a cold call, set up an appointment to meet, etc.  Just be sure to follow up. 

4.                Plan (and budget) to stay educated and stay in business.  Photography is always changing.  Today, more than ever, photographers must stay current with the latest technology and trends and always be ready to reinvent themselves.   This is true in terms of the equipment we use to make images and the ways and technology we use to market ourselves.

5.           Have a (five-year) plan.  Rejection is part of being a photographer, so if you are a freelancer or planning to operate your own studio, the ultimate question is how you will handle that.  Do you have a plan for the “lean” early years?  Do you plan to take other (unrelated) work in an effort to support your photography?  If so, how long can you support yourself in that unrelated field while still managing to produce new bodies of work and promote your photography business?  Because THAT is the focus—building your business and your career as a photographer.  Some may see results within a year.  Others may take five years to start earning a “stable” income from photography.  There’s no guarantee in this business.  One thing is certain, though:  If you are not shooting and if you are not aggressively marketing your business, you will not get jobs.  So, however you do it—make a plan, set goals for your photography business and constantly revisit them and work toward achieving them.        __________________________________________________________________________________

Keitaro YoshiokaA successful commercial photographer for over 25 years with client lists including IBM, Microsoft and Proctor & Gamble, Keitaro is not only a masterful photographer, but an expert in handling the business aspects of the job.

Alumni Profile: Catalina Piedrahita

2011 NESOP graduate Catalina Piedrahita has her work published in the latest issue of Revista Indigo, a Colombian magazine dedicated to showing artistic talents in multiple areas (graphic design, illustration, photography, visual arts and writing).

“This series presents images produced as an answer to sexist and misogynous attitudes that pervade our society. In particular, they are a reaction to conservative positions on issues like professional equality, sexual violence and reproductive rights in the context of American politics.  My objective is to contribute to the conversation and help shake the complacency of those whose rights are being violated; to encourage them to take on a more active political role and advocate more strongly for themselves. The rights of women are mutilated, partly due to fear of change and loss of privilege. But even more dangerous than this abuse by others is self-degradation. Women have become complicit in this war against equality by agreeing – implicitly or explicitly – with their own inferiority, or simply by remaining silent.

These images seek to show the literal and symbolic marks that aggression makes on women, while reminding the viewer of integral aspects of womanhood such as sexuality, sensuality, fertility and beauty. It is necessary that men and women alike accept the nature of femininity and allow all women to flourish with all their aspects and virtues.” – Catalina Piedrahita

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

To see more of this series, and to view her other work, visit her blog.

Alumni Profile: Tom Falcone ’12

After graduation, 2012 NESOP alum Tom Falcone was hired to go on the road and document a band off of Atlantic Records / Fearless Records; Tallahassee-based, Mayday Parade.  This included spending the Summer documenting their work on the Vans Warped Tour, followed by a headlining club tour in the Fall and an Australia headlining tour in December.

During some downtime in January / February, 2013, Falcone also worked with Hollywood Records recording artist Allstar Weekend.  He is currently back in the studio with Mayday Parade documenting them as they write their 4th LP in Atlanta, GA.

Next up: Falcone and Mayday Parade hit the road with Interscope Records / Hopeless Records recording artists All Time Low and Pierce the Veil, supporting their Spring ’13 tour.

To follow Tom Falcone / see more of his work:
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Twitter

Derek Sanders of Mayday Parade.  Bamboozle, 2011.

Derek Sanders of Mayday Parade. Bamboozle, 2011.

Allstar Weekend.  New York, NY, 2013.

Allstar Weekend. New York, NY, 2013.

Brooks Betts of Mayday Parade. Atlanta, GA, 2013.

Brooks Betts of Mayday Parade. Atlanta, GA, 2013.

Caleb Cole: Other People’s Clothes

Caleb Cole: Other People's Clothes

NESOP instructor and ’08 alum, Caleb Cole, has published a monograph of his series, Other People’s Clothes. In a limited edition of 250 copies, this hardcover book has 59 images (some never before exhibited), 146 pages, an introduction and interview by Jade Sylvan and design by Robyn Giragosian.

“The images in Other People’s Clothes are a product of my exploration of private moments of expectation, a visual expression of my experiences stepping into the shoes of the types of people I see on a daily basis.”

You can meet the artist and purchase Other People’s Clothes at his upcoming book release and signing on Friday, March 22nd, 6-8pm at Gallery Kayafas, or you can view the series and purchase this book on his website.

NESOP Student Rob Collins Lands Cover of Focus Skateboard Magazine

NESOP Student Rob Collins Lands Cover of Focus Skateboard Magazine

2nd year student Rob Collins has snagged the cover shot for the latest edition of Focus Skate Magazine.

Focus is a bi-monthly East Coast skateboarding publication highlighting the culture surrounding the sport.

This is Rob’s 2nd Focus Magazine cover.

Alumni Profile: Scott Achs, 2011

Alumni Profile: Scott Achs, 2011

’11 NESOP Grad Scott Achs was recently the featured artist for ‘Viewfinder’, an ongoing series that appears on the Official Blog of the Impossible Project.

“I usually think of myself as a contrarian, but from time to time, for the sake of inspiration, I find it important to experience a cliche. With this in mind, I put on my mid-October tourist hat, and along with my POLAROID ONE 600 and several packs of PX 680 Color Shade film I took to the road.”

To read more, please click here.
To see more of Scott’s work, please visit his blog: http://blog.scottachs.com

Alumni Profile: Philip Habib

Alumni Profile:  Philip Habib

For the November / December 2012 edition of American Photo Magazine, Philip Habib (NESOP ’81) takes a peek into Greek life on campus as part of his series ‘The Future of America‘.

“What interests me most,” Habib says, “is that some of the top leaders in this country— Presidents, CEOs—come from fraternities. This lack of inhibition is an integral moment in those lives.” Seeing it, he adds, “makes it easier to imagine public figures in their underwear.”

Full article: Tomorrow’s Leaders – American Photo Magazine, Nov-Dec 2012

See this, and other photos from the series on view at Scollay Square Gallery, Boston, through November 30th.