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Luis Brens | ‘Mis Momentos en Cuba’ at The Garner Center


Exhibition Runs: January 5, 2015 through February 14, 2015
Artist Reception: Wednesday, January 14th, 5pm – 7pm

LUISBRENSHIREZ1 Boston based photographer, professor and mixed media artist, Luis Brens, captures the vibrant street life of Cuba in this intimate essay on the rhythms of the street. Avenues lined in weathered architecture provide a backdrop for the pictures as we discover classic cars, youth culture and flamboyant personalities engaging us at every turn.

Originally from the Dominican Republic, Luis moved to Boston in 1990 and earned a BFA in Photography and Printmaking from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. He works as both a professor and commercial photographer and his work has been featured in Vogue, Boston Common and Boston Magazine. Luis currently teaches at both Northeastern University and The New England School of Photography.LUISBRENSHIREZ2

 Meet the artist on Wednesday, January 14th 5pm -7pm!

The Garner Center is open Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, and on Saturday from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm. The gallery is located at 537 Commonwealth Avenue in Boston on the second floor of the New England School of Photography.

Introducing the NESOP Alumni Portal

portalpicNESOP proudly announces the launch of our new Alumni Portal. Alumni can access the portal through the NESOP website under the Alumni menu navigation item from the home page, or, simply go here.

The alumni portal is an easy way to access job leads at any time, update your personal information and stay connected with fellow alumni and 2nd year students.  Alums are encouraged to take a few minutes to set up/request an account, your account request will then be submitted for approval. Once approved, you will receive a confirmation e-mail and will be ready to log-in and enjoy all the new features of the portal!

Things to Note:

Job Leads: As of  July 11th, job leads will no longer be emailed out to alumni database, all job leads will now be accessible through the portal and are available 24/7. They are posted in real time, so check back as often as you like.

Calls for Entry will also be posted and accessible via the portal. If you have a Call for Entry that you want to post to the portal for your fellow alums and current NESOP students, there are options for you to do so.

2nd Year Students: Your access to the portal is limited until you graduate. As a student, you will have access to job leads and Calls for Entry only. When you graduate, you will have access to the full Alumni Portal.

Expert Insights: Keitaro Yoshioka

NESOP Architectural Photography instructor, Keitaro Yoshioka, took a few minutes to share his thoughts on the most important elements for an emerging photographer in developing a marketing and business plan.

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NESOP: What do you believe are the five most important elements to guide an (emerging) photographer in developing his/her business plan and why? 

Keitaro: First of all, I think it is important to note that I don’t believe the standard MBA-format business plan works well for photographers.  It doesn’t fit the creative model for new photographers attempting to launch their careers.  Originally a vehicle for obtaining bank or investor funding, the “traditional” business plan has elements that are important but others that simply don’t apply in this context. 

I also think it is important that anyone entering this field understands the difference between photo enthusiasts and professional photographers.  If you want to make a living as a photographer, you need to have technical, creative and business skills and understand that, as a professional photographer, you are running your own business

With this in mind, I require my students to create both a marketing plan and a five-year plan.  Five key elements in developing these are:

1.                  Have a vision and trust your vision.  Know what makes you and your work unique.  The are a lot of photographers out there and they all have something different to offer; the most successful ones will all agree that you must trust your vision.  As an emerging artist, understand that your portfolio may be as good as or better than many of the established professionals.  To succeed, you must stay true to your vision and market yourself well. 

2.                Create your marketing materials and marketing plan; keep your “brand” in mind when doing this.  You are going to send out your own promotional cards and other promo materials (hard copy and/or electronic depending on your clients and strategy).  These materials should include your strongest image(s) and the images and materials should clearly represent/describe what you do.  Your materials should convey the image you want for your business. 

3.                Research the market to identify your potential clients. Create your (client) database based on research.  Your database should contain the company name (if applicable) and contact information (mailing address, e-mail address, direct phone or extension, website, social media sites, etc.) for all the individuals who will make the hiring decision.  Don’t simply target a department—send your materials to the marketing director, photo editor, creative director, art director, etc.  Ultimately, you want to get in front of these individuals, show them your portfolio and make a (positive) impression on them.  Create a schedule to follow up with anyone to whom you’ve sent your promotional materials—do what works: make a cold call, set up an appointment to meet, etc.  Just be sure to follow up. 

4.                Plan (and budget) to stay educated and stay in business.  Photography is always changing.  Today, more than ever, photographers must stay current with the latest technology and trends and always be ready to reinvent themselves.   This is true in terms of the equipment we use to make images and the ways and technology we use to market ourselves.

5.           Have a (five-year) plan.  Rejection is part of being a photographer, so if you are a freelancer or planning to operate your own studio, the ultimate question is how you will handle that.  Do you have a plan for the “lean” early years?  Do you plan to take other (unrelated) work in an effort to support your photography?  If so, how long can you support yourself in that unrelated field while still managing to produce new bodies of work and promote your photography business?  Because THAT is the focus—building your business and your career as a photographer.  Some may see results within a year.  Others may take five years to start earning a “stable” income from photography.  There’s no guarantee in this business.  One thing is certain, though:  If you are not shooting and if you are not aggressively marketing your business, you will not get jobs.  So, however you do it—make a plan, set goals for your photography business and constantly revisit them and work toward achieving them.        __________________________________________________________________________________

Keitaro YoshiokaA successful commercial photographer for over 25 years with client lists including IBM, Microsoft and Proctor & Gamble, Keitaro is not only a masterful photographer, but an expert in handling the business aspects of the job.

Alumni Profile: Catalina Piedrahita

2011 NESOP graduate Catalina Piedrahita has her work published in the latest issue of Revista Indigo, a Colombian magazine dedicated to showing artistic talents in multiple areas (graphic design, illustration, photography, visual arts and writing).

“This series presents images produced as an answer to sexist and misogynous attitudes that pervade our society. In particular, they are a reaction to conservative positions on issues like professional equality, sexual violence and reproductive rights in the context of American politics.  My objective is to contribute to the conversation and help shake the complacency of those whose rights are being violated; to encourage them to take on a more active political role and advocate more strongly for themselves. The rights of women are mutilated, partly due to fear of change and loss of privilege. But even more dangerous than this abuse by others is self-degradation. Women have become complicit in this war against equality by agreeing – implicitly or explicitly – with their own inferiority, or simply by remaining silent.

These images seek to show the literal and symbolic marks that aggression makes on women, while reminding the viewer of integral aspects of womanhood such as sexuality, sensuality, fertility and beauty. It is necessary that men and women alike accept the nature of femininity and allow all women to flourish with all their aspects and virtues.” – Catalina Piedrahita

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

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© Catalina Piedrahita 2013

To see more of this series, and to view her other work, visit her blog.

Caleb Cole: Other People’s Clothes

Caleb Cole: Other People's Clothes

NESOP instructor and ’08 alum, Caleb Cole, has published a monograph of his series, Other People’s Clothes. In a limited edition of 250 copies, this hardcover book has 59 images (some never before exhibited), 146 pages, an introduction and interview by Jade Sylvan and design by Robyn Giragosian.

“The images in Other People’s Clothes are a product of my exploration of private moments of expectation, a visual expression of my experiences stepping into the shoes of the types of people I see on a daily basis.”

You can meet the artist and purchase Other People’s Clothes at his upcoming book release and signing on Friday, March 22nd, 6-8pm at Gallery Kayafas, or you can view the series and purchase this book on his website.

Amy Giese Solo Show at Notre Dame Photography Gallery

Amy Giese Solo Show at Notre Dame Photography Gallery

NESOP graduate, instructor and Career & Alumni Services Coordinator Amy Giese has her work exhibited now through September 21st at the University of Notre Dame Photography Gallery.  The large scale, camera-less silver gelatin prints that she calls ‘skiagrams’, (Greek for ‘shadows written’) are part of an ongoing series at the gallery titled “Concealed at first at last I appear”.

Upcoming Exhibition by NESOP Documentary Instructor, Michael Hintlian

Upcoming Exhibition by Documentary Instructor, Michael Hintlian

NESOP Documentary Instructor Michael Hintlian‘s Exhibition “No Transfer: Photographs from Public Transportation” opens August 31st at The May Gallery at Webster University, St. Louis, MO.

“All the photographs in the No Transfer gallery were made from the window of a bus or train. Starting out of a frustration with working on the street in Boston – a very difficult place for a street photographer – it grew into an absorbing project. Shooting from a bus offered new challenges, how quickly I needed to work, the right seat, dirty and tinted windows. Almost immediately something different began to happen, something I had been trying to honor for a long time, the ability to respond to the first impulse before my mind starts to run the photograph. On a bus or train there are no second chances or time to consider anything more than perception and react with a camera. Henry Wessel said it well: “…(being) outside your mind, your eyes far ahead of your thoughts.” On a bus or train there are no second chances or time to consider anything more than perception and react with a camera. And I am still learning.”

– Michael Hintlian

To see more images from this gallery, please visit: http://www.hintlian.com/


Michael Hintlian has been teaching documentary photography at NESOP since 2007. A dedicated, award-winning documentary photographer, Michael’s projects have taken him across the globe. He earned his BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University and his MBA from the Johnson School of Management at Cornell University. In addition to NESOP, his teaching includes the School of the Museum of Fine Arts and Tufts University. Michael has also been a lecturer and presenter in several venues throughout the U.S. including the Leica Historical Society of America in Charlotte, NC; The Photographic Resource Center in Boston; the Hoboken Historical Museum in NJ; the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston; WGBH, Tufts University in Medford, MA; and the Griffin Museum of Photography in Winchester, MA. Michael’s work has been widely published in periodicals including The Christian Science Monitor, Architectural Design and Boston Magazine. His work has been exhibited all over the world. His book, Digging: The Workers of Boston’s Big Dig, has been a success in the documentary world. It remains a revealing source of local history and a celebratory tribute to the men and women working America’s most ambitious infrastructure project.

Congratulations to … NESOP! (Hey, that’s us!)

Congratulations to ... NESOP!  (Hey, that's us!)

New England School of Photography is proud to announce that we were named “Best of Boston 2012” for Arts Education by Boston Magazine!

“Best of Boston” is an annual issue for Boston Magazine, and is known as “the definitive guide to the city’s finest“.   We are extremely honored to be included, and to receive this recognition.

NESOP Welcomes New Staff Members

NESOP is pleased to announce three new additions to our Main Office Staff!

Cameron MacMartin is the new Registrar / Assistant to the Academic Director.

As a 2012 Graduate of the NESOP Full-Time Professional Photography Program, possessing extensive management experience as well as having had direct experience working in the Registrar’s Office of another post-secondary institution, Cameron has a unique combination of skills that make her perfect for this position.  Additionally, after working as a tour manager for several years with Cirque du Soleil, Cameron will undoubtedly be well-prepared to juggle the many tasks at hand!

Cameron will be available to respond to Registrar & Academic-related requests Tuesday through Friday, each week.

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Nicolette Pinnock started with us on June 25th as the new Director of Financial Aid.

Nicolette has twelve years experience in financial aid, working for institutions such as the Bryman Institute, Berklee College of Music, ITT Tech and Bay State College.  She spent some time working with Mark prior to his departure, ensuring a smooth transition for students and administration, and we are happy to have her on board!

Nicolette will be available Monday through Friday, each week.

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Mark Giannini is NESOP’s new Director of Admissions & Recruiting.

Mark comes to NESOP with a graduate degree in Integrated Marketing Communication and over ten years experience in admissions and recruiting with the Boston Architectural Center, where he not only had success in growing enrollment and improving retention, but was also the individual solely responsible for the marketing and recruiting to launch their Distance Master of Architecture program.  He has experience identifying and targeting new student markets and has worked at and managed others within all levels of the enrollment spectrum.

Mark will be in the office Monday through Friday working toward exceeding our enrollment goals.

Blink – A Photography Pop-Up Exhibition

Blink – A Photography Pop-Up Exhibition

NESOP Faculty members Michael Hintlian (Documentary) and Erin Carey (Color) are stepping out of the classroom on June 30th to participate in “Blink – A Photography Pop-Up Exhibition” hosted by Eric Luden at Digital Silver Imaging in Belmont, MA.

They will be among 30+ local photographers to join in this one-day non-curated, un-juried event where participants simply bring 1 print, unmatted or framed, to be displayed on metal walls with magnets.

Click on the photo above for more information and to RSVP to this event!